Sunday, 20 January 2008

Dreams and society

How do current affairs affect the unconscious mind?

I'd say that our dreams and our unconscious, in fact, have a dominant influence over what goes on in the external world residing outside our own heads - rather than the other way 'round.

Saturday, 19 January 2008

Different people

I've had such a closed mind by isolating myself so much. There are great people to meet everywhere. I like talking to people who extremely different from me, from different backgrounds.

It is also idiotic to segregate certain people into boxes, assuming that you can only interact with someone from a certain background, etc, etc.

Books I hope to write

See-Saw

An experimental novel that shall switch in and out from present and past tense. The title - and the work itself - symbolizes the transition between childhood and teenagehood. I shall draw inspiration from my own experiences: how I have adapted to living in Great Britain after living in Chile (whilst still being a British person), and how my intellect developed so abruptly.


Dream Stairs

I shall take the remnants of 'Dream Fadeout' (a novel I failed to write) to create this work which will just be a collection of bizarre situations. The character will be a seeker who can't cope with reality, so he creates a new one.

http://www.freewebs.com/simonking/novelextractno1.htm
http://www.freewebs.com/simonking/novelextractno2.htm

Teenage Ruminations

A collection of short stories (two of them can be read at my freewebs website).

The author

Most writers write in symbols, but there must always be autobiographical tinges scattered around everywhere in the work itself. I'm always intrigued in reading interviews with authors, to see how it all compares to their writing. I often find that their responses tend to bear extreme similarities to their writing style. Writing can always be a psychological outlet for the author, a way of dispensing obsessions or worries; it can be a form of contact.

Saturday, 12 January 2008

Live musical performance

http://www.freewebs.com/simonking/novelextractno1.htm

I've seen a vast variety of musical performances in Sheffield: jazz, rock, experimental, classical, death metal, filthy turd... I think I'm the only person that's gone to all these concerts in this particular city.

It's quite anthropological how I see certain people turning up for certain events. I'm the only person in Sheffield who mixes it up. I hide in the corner with a book under my nose, too.

It's such a surreal, dream-like setting......


I've caught Mark E. Smith's and Drumbo's eyes several times.

I've seen Filthy Turd's willy.

2008 and my writing

www.freewebs.com/simonking

I really look forward to getting out of hospital for good (there's still quite a long way to go), so that I can get back to my writing.

The writing I did in '07 was really rushed. I'm full of ideas, and I can't wait to get my concentration back.

I've lost 2 months of my life.

TOP 5 WRITERS ACCORDING TO SIMON KING

5
Paul Auster
Auster fuses the metric pace of crime thrillers with metaphysical subjects, making this certain genre of fiction - which usually appeals to smaller, intellectual audiences - easily accessible and more exciting for the standard literary punter.

His characters are seekers who find themselves under new situations which are coincidences: chance events. They adjust to it in a quest to find answers about themselves - an identity.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=544047531449302445&q=paul+auster&total=82&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=0

4
Julio Cortazar


Cortazar, along Poe and Borges, ranks as one of the greatest short story writers. He usually sets his stories in realistic situations, but slowly begins to integrate fantastic elements, surprising and unsettling the reader. The way he strings words together is absolutely wonderful; he manages to hold the reader's attention without any real plot development. Along with writers like Rulfo, Onetti and Borges, he deserves to be credited as one of the creators of 'magic realism'.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3562250863327291954&q=julio+cortazar&total=322&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=1
3
William Faulkner

A writer who is more acclaimed for 'form' rather than 'content'. Faulkner writes from many angles at once; he doesn't write chronologically, he gets under the skin of his characters via a dense use of stream of consciousness. Unlike Joyce (who he hasn't got that much in common with), I find that what he is communicating is far more accessible and meaningful. At heart, he is still a storyteller depicting the lives of very simple people living in the south of U. S. A., and he does it beautifully well.

2
Jorge Luis Borges

The best writer that blurs our perceptions between fantasy and reality - the ultimate metaphysical writer. His short stories can be read and read and re-read while still maintaining the initial 'wow' factor one initially gets. He was not 'erudite' as many say, but had a child-like fascination for literature that never diminished with his old age.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5764775529251127235&q=jorge+luis+borges&total=275&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=3

1
J. G. Ballard


I love the way all his characters crave the dangerous and the bizarre.

I really regret........

...Having deleted this blog, and then going insane and posting all that shite. I shouldn't have done it.

Anyway, I'll get back to posting 'good', rational stuff again.

My audience: Doug, Gareth, Ryan and Ulysses.